ENV Courses

ENV101 - Introduction to Environmental Science (3 cr.)

Environmental science is the study of natural ecosystems, human impacts on the environment, and sustainable management of the Earth's resources. Processes of the physical and biological environment are used as a basis for consideration of current environmental issues. Topics considered include energy consumption and global warming, water and air pollution, waste management, impacts of deforestation on biodiversity and other environmental changes occurring on a global scale. (Fall/Winter/Spring). Liberal arts.

ENV180 - Environmental Science Field Immersion (1 cr.)

First semester environmental science freshmen are introduced to SUNY Plattsburgh Environmental Science programs and faculty as well as environmental science professionals through field trips and/or lectures. This course is designed to help students explore career paths and introduce them to regional environmental science issues. (Fall). Prerequisite: POI.

ENV199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring, Summer & Fall).

ENV201 - Environment and Society (3 cr.)

Historical, ethical, economic, legal and policy aspects of environmental science are analyzed with an emphasis on their interrelationships. Various strategies of pollution abatement are considered. (Spring & Fall).

ENV206 - Environmental Technology I (3 cr.)

An overview of the current technological solutions available for waste management and pollution control. Subject matter will include a review of priority pollutants, contaminant sources, and an assessment of pollution control technologies for wastewater treatment, hazardous waste transport and disposal, air pollution, and noise pollution. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENV101 or BIO102 or ENV201 or POI.

ENV214 - Wildland Fire (1 cr.)

An integration of the biotic and abiotic factors of fire-prone environments with fire behavior and fire effects on vegetation, wildlife, and nutrient cycles. The successes and failures of federal fire management policies and fire hazards for people living at the urban-wildland interface will also be discussed. (Every Other Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

ENV238 - Forest Mensuration (3 cr.)

Forest mensuration is one of the most fundamental disciplines within forest and related sciences. It deals with the measurement of trees and stands and the analysis of the resultant information. Students in this class will get firsthand experience with these measurements and analyses. This course also reviews the notable influence of statistics on forest mensuration methods and techniques; it reviews and evaluates elementary statistical concepts. (Every Year at Clinton County CV-Tec).

ENV273 - HAZWOPER: Hazardous Waste Operations & Emergency Response (2 cr.)

This course meets the requirements of the Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) for hazardous materials operations and emergency response program which are required by both EPA and OSHA. The course leads to a 40-hour HAZWOPER certificate. This certification is a job requirement for many entry-level positions in the area of environmental consulting potentially filled by our programs in both geology and environmental science. (Winter/Summer). Prerequisite: senior standing.

ENV274 - Solid Waste Management and the Environment (1 cr.)

This course provides a broad look at the integration of solid waste management and its relationship with the environment through class work and field investigations at the Clinton County Landfill. An exploration of economics, regulations, waste management and sanitary landfill design will help lead to an understanding of how our production/consumption lifestyle impacts the environment, and the safeguards in place to help protect it. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

ENV299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

ENV304 - Ecology (4 cr.)

Refer to BIO304 course description. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO102.

ENV304L - Ecology Lab (0 cr.)

(Spring & Fall).

ENV306 - Atmospheric Processes (3 cr.)

An introduction to atmospheric processes including energy transfer and interactions, condensation and precipitation, atmospheric circulation, climate, and climatic change. Emphasis will be placed upon how the atmosphere impacts various world ecosystems. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENV101 or GEL101.

ENV307 - World Environments and People (3 cr.)

Study of each of the major world environmental realms. How people have adjusted lifestyles to live better with their environment and the extent to which people have used technology to change the environment. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: completion of natural science and social science general education requirements.

ENV310 - Environmental Planning (3 cr.)

Basic concepts and procedures of environmental planning, including environmental design concepts, open space conservation strategies, watershed protection, land use regulations, socioeconomic and political factors, and planning in the Adirondacks and Catskill Parks. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: GEL101 or GEG120 or ENV101 or ENV201.

ENV329 - Environmental Management (3 cr.)

Fundamental approaches of managing, land, air and water resources for environmental protection and pollution control. Emphasis on ecological principles as well as practical aspects of compliance with environmental regulations. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENV101 or ENV201; ENV304/BIO304.

ENV332 - Plant Ecology (3 cr.)

Two-hour lecture and a three-hour laboratory. Examines important aspects of specialized areas of plant ecology. Lecture topics include interactions between plants and their environment, models of plant strategies and vegetation processes, and roles of vegetation as an ecosystem component. Laboratories emphasize vegetation sampling techniques and data analysis. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO304/ENV304

ENV332L - Plant Ecology Lab (0 cr.)

(Spring).

ENV333 - Biostatistics (3 cr.)

Introduction to statistical analysis of univariate biological data, including: statistics of location and dispersion, analysis of variance (ANOVA), linear regression, correlation, and non-parametric tests. Discussion of experimental design and use of a statistical package for data analysis, followed by interpretation of results. (Spring & Fall). Prerequisites: A 100-level science course and sophomore standing.

ENV337 - Field Ecology (3 cr.)

A firsthand approach to field studies of Northern New York plants and animals and the environments in which they interact. General identification of organisms, and their population and community ecological relationships. Lectures and laboratory. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO304/ENV304.

ENV338 - Forest Ecology and Management (4 cr.)

Evaluates interrelationships between major environmental factors in forested ecosystems. Models describing the growth of forest stands are discussed along with analyses of silvicultural systems for uneven-aged and even-aged forest stands. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO304 or ENV304 (ENV332 is recommended).

ENV338L - Forest Ecology and Management Lab (0 cr.)

(Fall).

ENV339L - Wetlands Ecology and Management Lab (0 cr.)

(Fall).

ENV340 - Environmental Science Seminar (3 cr.)

Readings, research and writing on selected topics/issues in environmental science, seminar discussions and presentations. Approved AWR. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: junior standing; ENG101; ENV201 or BIO102; LIB105 or LIB200.

ENV347 - Instrumentation and Water Quality Analysis (3 cr.)

Instrumental analysis of samples from aquatic systems involving automated colorimetry, atomic absorption spectrophotometry, gas chromatography, ion chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography. Students will learn basic analytical techniques and apply them in group projects investigating real-world water quality problems. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CHE101 or CHE112.

ENV347L - Instrumentation and Water Quality Analysis Lab (0 cr.)

(Spring).

ENV350 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Mapping (3 cr.)

Introduction to geographic information systems (GIS), map design, and ArcView GIS software licensed by Environmental Systems Research Institute. Students will prepare maps and store, retrieve, and analyze spatial data. (Spring & Fall). Prerequisite: GEG120 or GEL101 or POI.

ENV350R - GIS/Mapping Recitation (0 cr.)

Students registering for ENV350 must register for the corresponding ENV350R recitation section.

ENV355 - Principles of Remote Sensing (3 cr.)

Introduction to basic concepts in photogrammetry, air photo interpretation and remote sensing. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENV101 or ENV201 or GEG120 or GEL101.

ENV356 - Environmental Technology II (3 cr.)

A continuation of ENV206. This course offers an advanced, quantitative approach to designing technological solutions for waste management and pollution control. Subject matter will include hydraulic transport systems, pollutant fate and transport in surface waters, stormwater management, water and wastewater treatment facilities, and solid waste management systems. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: MAT131 or MAT222 or MAT225; ENV206; or POI.

ENV364 - Ecological Economics (3 cr.)

This course intertwines a traditional economic and an ecological approach to the study of the political economy of the environment. Ecological economics seeks to place economic activity in the context of the biological and physical systems that support life, including human activities. Liberal arts. (Fall). Prerequisites: ECO101 or ENV101 or ENV201 or GEG121.

ENV366 - Global Climate Change: Turning Knowledge into Action (3 cr.)

An introduction to global climate change. Course topics include the scientific principles of global climate change, including its detection, impacts, and mitigation strategies. The course will provide up-to-date information on anthropogenic global climate change and address the social, economic, and political aspects of this international environmental issue. Liberal arts. (Every Other Spring). Prerequisites: completion of natural science and technology general education requirement.

ENV370 - Soil Science (4 cr.)

Study of physical, chemical and biological properties of soils and their relationship to the environment. Includes the study of soil formation and profile characteristics, soil organisms, nutrients cycling and management, soil acidity and non-point pollution. Laboratory emphasizes scientific investigations of soil management questions. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: BIO102; ENV304 or BIO304; GEL101; CHE101 or CHE111.

ENV370L - Soil Science Lab (0 cr.)

(Fall).

ENV371 - Environmental Leadership (3 cr.)

Explores effective leadership in the environmental context and nurtures students' leadership capacities in a number of key areas crucial to environmental problem solving, such as: creating effective collaborations, environmental conflict management, participatory processes and community engagement, project planning and management, and social movements and change management. Liberal arts. (Spring). Prerequisites: junior standing in an environmental major (ENV, EVS, GEG, GEL).

ENV399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

ENV406 - Climate Change Science (3 cr.)

An introduction to the science of global climate change. Course topics will include radiative transfer and the Earth's energy balance, influence of Earth system components on the climate system (atmosphere, ocean, biosphere, cryosphere), natural and human drivers of climate change, the detection and prediction of long-term climate trends, and the impacts of anthropogenic climate change. Liberal arts. (Fall). Prerequisites: MAT221 or MAT224 or MAT228 or POI.

ENV407 - Restoration Ecology (3 cr.)

Introduction to the interdisciplinary field of restoration ecology. Emphasis placed on understanding key ecological principles that are applied to restore degraded ecosystems as well as project planning and management. Liberal arts. (Spring). Prerequisites: BIO/ENV304 and one advanced ecology elective or POI.

ENV409 - Senior Project (3 to 12 cr.)

Individual research on an environmental problem selected by the student with faculty guidance. Designed to give the student skills in proposal writing, methods and procedures of research and report writing. (Spring, Summer & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: senior standing.

ENV411 - Water Quality Modeling (4 cr.)

Mathematical modeling of water quality. Hypotheses on the relationship between pollutant loading and resultant water quality will be formulated and tested. (Fall). Prerequisites: ENV206 or ENV305, MAT221, or POI.

ENV411L - Water Quality Modeling Lab (0 cr.)

(Fall).

ENV417 - Environmental Impact Assessment (3 cr.)

Study of the environmental impact assessment process including major federal (NEPA), state (SEQR), regional and local regulations; environmental impact statement preparation; assessment methodologies; and public participation. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: GEG120 or ENV201 or ENV310; junior standing.

ENV419 - Geographic Information Systems Applications (3 cr.)

Use of geographic information systems (GIS) for analysis. Applications in the environmental sciences, land use planning, and environmental impact assessment. Use of ArcMap, Spatial Analyst and 3-D Analyst. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENV350/GEG350 or POI.

ENV421 - Environmental Law and Policy (3 cr.)

This course analyzes the role played by the different branches of government and the public in shaping and determining environmental policy and law. Major environmental statutes and agency regulations at the local, federal and international level are examined. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: junior standing and either ENV304 or GEL310 or PSC311 or GEG332 or ECO392 or POI.

ENV430 - Wildlife Ecology and Management (4 cr.)

Wildlife Ecology seeks to explore the natural history, biodiversity, diel cycles, behavior and movement patterns, food preference, and community and habitat interactions among wildlife species. Exploration of methods for surveying and identifying wildlife, specifically vertebrates, will offer opportunities for discussion of primary literature. Independent and group field research will stem from careful primary literature searches and class discussion. Through trapping, surveys, animal tracking using GPS and radio-telemetry, strict adherence to the scientific method, and GIS analysis, students will gain first-hand knowledge of tools for the wildlife professional. The course will combine morning lecture with afternoon data collection, and evening analysis and presentation. (Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENV/BIO304.

ENV431 - Freshwater Ecology (4 cr.)

A study of the biological, chemical and physical features of lakes and other inland waters. An analysis of the interactions between biological communities and their aquatic environment. Laboratory involves examination of freshwater biota and habitats, survey of limnological methods and analysis of data. Lecture and laboratory. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO304/ENV304.

ENV431L - Freshwater Ecology Lab (0 cr.)

(Fall).

ENV433 - River Ecology (4 cr.)

Introduction to the ecology of river and stream ecosystems. Analysis of biological communities, physical and chemical attributes, watershed dynamics, and current ecological theory. Field investigation of Adirondack streams and rivers. Weekly lecture and laboratory sessions. (every other Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENV304/BIO304 or POI.

ENV433L - River Ecology Lab (0 cr.)

(Fall).

ENV436 - Population and Community Ecology (3 cr.)

An introduction to the growth, structure and regulation of natural populations and their organization into plant and animal communities. Topics covered will include population genetics and evolution, limiting factors, competition, predator-prey relationships, concepts of organism association into communities, trophic structure, food webs and ecological succession. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENV/BIO304.

ENV439 - Wetland Ecology and Management (4 cr.)

Introduction to the hydrological, chemical, and biological interactions in wetland ecosystems. Emphasis placed on integrating ecological, social, and economic values into management and protection of wetland habitats. Liberal arts. (Fall). Prerequisites: BIO/ENV304 and CHE101 or CHE111 and junior standing.

ENV440 - Agriculture and the Environment (3 cr.)

Integration and analysis of the multiple facets of animal agriculture and its interaction with the environment including: farm management, biotechnology, soil, and waste management, nutrient management and sustainable agriculture. Emphasis will be placed on the agricultural and environmental interface. Lecture and lab. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENV304; CHE101 or CHE111/CHE112 or POI.

ENV440L - Agriculture and the Environment Lab (0 cr.)

(Fall).

ENV444 - Fisheries Ecology and Management (3 cr.)

Introduction to fisheries ecology and management. Topics include ichthyology, principles of fishery science, case studies of freshwater and marine fishery management successes and failures, aquaculture, sustainable fisheries issues, history of Great Lakes fisheries, and Lake Champlain fishery topics. Liberal arts. (Spring). Prerequisites: ENV304/BIO304 or POI.

ENV451 - Advanced Topics in Geographic Information Systems (3 cr.)

Advanced Geographic Information System (GIS) methods and contemporary issues are explored. Topics include Web and smart phone applications, geodatabase principles, Python programming for GIS, raster modeling, network analysis, and decision support models. Students will use ESRI ArcGIS and other software as appropriate. Liberal arts. (Fall). Prerequisites: ENV350/GEG350 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems with a grade of C or better. ENV419 GIS Applications recommended.

ENV455 - Advanced Remote Sensing (3 cr.)

Advanced topics in remote sensing including concepts in electromagnetic radiation, sensors and platforms, and image interpretation. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENV355.

ENV462 - Ecosystem Ecology (3 cr.)

An overview of theory and concepts in ecosystem ecology through a survey of the literature, including classical papers. Source materials will be evaluated and critiqued through a combination of lectures, written assignments, and student-led discussions. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO304 or ENV304 or POI.

ENV480 - Advanced Topics in Ecology (3 cr.)

Specialized subjects in environmental science with direct application to modern environmental issues. Topic varies with instructor and semester; potential subjects include landscape ecology, preservation of ecological diversity, global climate change, fire ecology, population ecology. Course includes reading original research papers, giving oral presentations and writing term papers. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: senior environmental science major or POI.

ENV481 - Sustainability (3 cr.)

A multidisciplinary approach will be used to introduce students to the concept of sustainability and explore sustainable development issues at the local, national and international levels. Topics such as the historical development of the concept of sustainability, the equitable distribution of ecosystem services and sustainable economic development will be explored. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: junior standing and either ENV304 or GEL310 or PSC311 or GEG332 or ECO392 or POI.

ENV498 - Internship (1 to 15 cr.)

(Spring, Summer & Fall).

ENV499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring, Summer & Fall).

ENV507 - Restoration Ecology (3 cr.)

Introduction to the interdisciplinary field of restoration ecology. Emphasis placed on understanding key ecological principles that are applied to restore degraded ecosystems as well as project planning and management. Students who have taken ENV407 for credit are ineligible for credit in ENV507. Liberal arts. (Spring).

ENV519 - GIS Applications (3 cr.)

Application of geographic information systems (GIS) for analysis in the natural sciences, land use planning, and environmental impact assessment. Students will engage in a guided research project. Use of ArcMap, Spatial Analyst and 3-D Analyst. Students may not receive credit for both ENV419 and ENV519. (Spring). Prerequisite: ENV350 or GEG350 or POI.

ENV521 - Environmental Law and Policy (3 cr.)

This course analyzes the role played by the different branches of government and the public in shaping and determining environmental policy and law. Major environmental statutes and agency regulations at the local, federal and international level are examined. Students undertake extensive literature research on a legal or policy topic approved by the instructor. Credit will not be given for both ENV421 and ENV521. Prerequisites: an undergraduate degree in environmental science or related field or POI.

ENV530 - Wildlife Ecology and Management (4 cr.)

Wildlife Ecology seeks to explore the natural history and behavior of wildlife species. Exploration of methods for surveying and identifying wildlife, specifically vertebrates, will offer opportunities for discussion of primary literature. Through trapping, surveys, animal tracking using GPS and radio-telemetry, strict adherence to the scientific method, and GIS analysis, students will gain first-hand knowledge of tools for the wildlife professional. An independent research project, requiring time outside of class, will be developed, implemented, and presented by the graduate student. Student may not receive credit for both ENV430 and ENV530. (Fall). Prerequisite: one upper-division ecology course beyond general ecology or POI.

ENV531 - Freshwater Ecology (4 cr.)

A study of the biological, chemical, and physical features of lakes and other inland waters. An analysis of the interactions between biological communities and their aquatic environment. Laboratory involves examination of freshwater biota and habitats, survey of limnological methods and analysis of data. Lecture and laboratory. (Fall). Prerequisites: graduate standing, bachelors degree in science.

ENV533 - River Ecology (4 cr.)

Advanced ecology and management of river and stream ecosystems. Analysis of biological communities, physical and chemical attributes, watershed dynamics, and current ecological theory. Field investigation of Adirondack streams and rivers. Weekly lectures and laboratory sessions. Students cannot receive credit for ENV533 if they have previously received credit for ENV433. (Every Other Fall). Prerequisite: one upper division ecology course beyond general ecology or POI.

ENV536 - Advanced Population and Community Ecology (3 cr.)

A recitation course that builds on theory and models of population growth, regulation, community stability and persistence given global change concerns. In depth student-led discussion will focus on population ecology, including population genetics and evolutionary ecology, regulation/limitation debate, equilibrium versus non-equilibrium theory, competition theory, dynamics of direct and indirect predation, community assembly rules, and metapopulation dynamics. Literature surveys will culminate in a review paper on a population or community ecology topic and laboratory experiments will test applications of population growth models under various environmental treatment scenarios and be written as a sample of primary literature. Students who have received credit for ENV336 or ENV436 may not receive credit for ENV536. (Spring). Prerequisite: ENV/BIO304.

ENV544 - Fisheries Ecology and Management (3 cr.)

Fisheries ecology and management. Topics include ichthyology, principles of fishery science, case studies of freshwater and marine fishery management successes and failures, aquaculture, sustainable fisheries issues, history of Great Lakes fisheries, and Lake Champlain fishery topics. Liberal arts. (Spring).

ENV562 - Ecosystem Ecology (3 cr.)

An overview of theory and concepts in ecosystem ecology through a survey of the literature, including classical papers. Source materials will be evaluated and critiqued through a combination of lectures, written assignments and student-led discussions. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO304 or ENV304 or POI

ENV580 - Advanced Topics in Ecology (1 to 4 cr.)

Specialized subjects in environmental science with direct application to modern environmental issues. Topics vary with instructor and semester; potential subjects include landscape ecology, preservation of ecological diversity, global climate change, fire ecology, insect ecology, advanced concepts in ecology and others. Ecological concepts for the topic covered will be developed through reading original research papers, giving oral presentations, and written assignments. Can be repeated for credit with a different topic. Students can receive credit for this course only if they have not received credit for ENV 480 with the same topic. Prerequisite: Graduate Student Standing.

ENV581 - Sustainability (3 cr.)

A multidisciplinary approach will be used to introduce students to the concept of sustainability and explore sustainable development issues at the local, national and international levels. Topics such as the historical development of the concept of sustainability, the equitable distribution of ecosystem services and sustainable economic development will be explored. Students undertake extensive literature research on a topic approved by the instructor. Credit will not be given for both ENV481 and ENV581. (Spring).

ENV595 - Graduate Research (1 to 6 cr.)

Original research project individually arranged between student and faculty sponsor. Course may be repeated. (Fall/Spring).

ENV599 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring & Fall).

Search the College Course Catalog

Enter a course number or three-letter curriculum code to search the College Catalog:

Alphabetical Listing of Curriculum Descriptions by Course Subject

A

  • Africana Studies = AAS
  • Accounting = ACC
  • Anthropology = ANT
  • Arabic = ARA
  • Art = ART
  • Asian Studies = ASI
  • Astronomy = AST

B

  • Biology = BIO
  • Business = BUS

C

  • Canadian Studies = CAS
  • Communications Disorders & Sciences = CDS
  • Consumer Economics Management = CEM
  • Chemistry = CHE
  • Counseling = CLG
  • Career Life Planning = CLP
  • Communication Studies = CMM
  • Computer Science = CSC
  • Criminal Justice = CRI

E

  • Economics = ECO
  • Education = EDU
  • Education - Administration = EDA
  • Education - Mathematics = EDM
  • Education - Reading = EDR
  • Education - Special = EDS
  • English = ENG
  • Environmental Science = ENV
  • English as a Second Language = ESL
  • Expeditionary Studies = EXP

F

  • Finance = FIN
  • Foreign Languages & Literature = FLL
  • French = FRE
  • Freshman Seminar = FRS
  • Freshman Experience = FRX

G

  • Geography = GEG
  • Gender & Women's Studies = GWS
  • Geology = GEL
  • German = GER

H

  • Health Education = HED
  • History = HIS
  • Honors = HON
  • Hotel, Restaurant, & Tourism Management = HRT
  • Human Development and Family Relations = HDF

I

  • Interdisciplinary Studies = INT
  • Italian = ITA

J

  • Journalism = JOU

L

  • Latin American Studies = LAS
  • Latin = LAT
  • Leadership = MLS
  • Library Skills = LIB
  • Language & Linguistics = LIN

M

  • Mathematics = MAT
  • Meteorology = MET
  • Military Studies = MTS
  • Management & International Business = MGM
  • Marketing & Entrepreneurship = MKE
  • Minority Studies = MNS
  • Music = MUS

N

  • Nursing = NUR
  • Nutrition = FNI

P

  • Physical Education = PED
  • Philosophy = PHI
  • Physics = PHY
  • Portuguese = POR
  • Political Science = PSC
  • Psychology = PSY

R

  • Reading = RDG
  • Recreation = REC
  • Russian = RUS

S

  • Science & Society = SCI
  • Sociology = SOC
  • Spanish = SPA
  • Social Work = SWK

T

  • Theatre = THE
  • Tutor Training = TTR