ENG Courses

ENG100 - College Writing I (4 cr.)

Entry-level writing course providing extensive practice in writing and reading in order to prepare students for ENG101, College Writing II. Readings and writing assignments will vary from section to section, but students will write 300-500 words per week, leading to a minimum of five out-of-class formal assignments (essays and argument-based new media written texts, such as a web-based film review incorporating Internet video excerpts; a podcast and script presenting student views on a new graduation requirement; etc.); at least 5000 words of finished copy by the conclusion of the course. Students will also gain experience with in-class writing. Students must earn a grade of C (2.0) or better in order to enroll in ENG101. Students who have credit for ENG101 or its equivalent cannot take ENG100 for credit. Special sections of ENG100 are available for students who speak and write English as a second language. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring).

ENG100R - College Writing I Recitation (0 cr.)

Students registering for ENG100 must register for the corresponding ENG100R recitation section.

ENG101 - College Writing II (3 to 4 cr.)

Extensive practice in writing and revising through multiple drafts, with the aim of helping students learn to think critically and to produce coherent college-level texts. Readings and writing assignments will vary from section to section, but students will write a minimum of five out-of-class formal assignments (at least 5000-6250 words or 20-25 pages of finished copy for all five combined), at least one of which will require research and documentation using multiple sources. Students must earn a grade of C (2.0) or better in ENG101 to meet graduation requirements. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Prerequisites: C (2.0) or better in ENG100 or placement by examination.

ENG111 - Visions of America (3 cr.)

Study of literature as means of understanding the narratives of American history, the development of common institutions in American society, how these institutions have affected different groups, and America's evolving relationship with the rest of the world. Although emphasis will vary, each offering will cover at least a 150-year period and will include aboriginal concerns, immigration, inequality, growth, colonialism, the environment, individual responsibility, issues of power and conflict, and the relationship between history and literature. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring/Summer).

ENG122 - Grammar and Punctuation Workshop (1 to 3 cr.)

Understanding English grammar and punctuation; emphasis on correcting errors in both. (Spring, Summer & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101

ENG130 - Topics in English (1 cr.)

Various topics in literature taught at an introductory level. Topics might include single authors (C.S. Lewis, Washington Irving), themes (nuclear war fiction) or genres (melodrama). (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG160 - Introduction to Poetry (3 cr.)

Forms and conventions of poetry, appreciation of poets and their art. (Spring, Summer & Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG161 - Introduction to Fiction (3 cr.)

Forms and conventions of prose fiction, appreciation of the art of the short story and of the novel, preparation for more advanced studies in fiction. (Spring, Summer & Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG162 - Introduction to Drama (3 cr.)

Forms and conventions of the drama, appreciation of the play on the stage and as literature, preparation for more advanced studies in the drama. (Spring). Liberal arts.

ENG163 - Introduction to Film and Literature (3 cr.)

Examination and comparison of the narrative arts of film and literature. The course introduces students to film form and literary form, considers analogies between these forms, studies critical theories of film and literature, explores film adaptations, and examines the historical and aesthetic forces out of which film and literature grow. (Spring & Summer). Liberal arts.

ENG164 - Introduction to Shakespeare (3 cr.)

Introduction to Shakespeare's plays for students with little or no previous knowledge of Shakespeare or of drama. Students read and discuss eight to ten plays. Focus on both the aesthetic qualities of the plays--style, structure, tone, technique--and on the penetrating analyses of the human condition they present. Recommended for non-English majors. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG170 - Multiethnic American Literature (3 cr.)

An introduction to the comparative study of the literature produced by diverse U.S. ethnic groups, including Native American oral legends, narratives and testimonies, African American literature, and the writings of Latino and Asian Americans. Selected works serve as a way to understand each group's response to and relations with U.S. society and institutions, and to the mainstream historical narrative. (Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG195 - Fundamentals of Literary Study I: The Literary Text (3 cr.)

A writing intensive introducton to the study of individual literary works, with the relationship between formal properties on the one hand and the pleasures and values of reading on the other. Works studied will include poetry, fiction, and drama, with the greatest emphasis on poetry. This is one of two gateway courses to upper-level literature courses; therefore, learning the vocabulary of literary criticism, and how to write a paper of literary criticism, including research, is essential. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

ENG196 - Fundamentals of Literary Study II: Trends and Movements (3 cr.)

A writing intensive introduction to the study of literary works as representative of trends, movements, and sensibilities, such as Neo-Classicism, Romanticism, Modernism, Feminism, and Post-Colonialism. Special attention will be paid to English and American Literatures. This is one of two gateway courses to upper-level literature courses; therefore, learning the vocabulary of literary criticism, including research, is essential. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

ENG199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

ENG201 - Creative Writing (3 cr.)

Introduction to the art of creative writing with emphasis on language, craft and revision. Students will learn and apply the fundamentals of creative writing, and they will learn how to critique poetry and fiction. Attention to other genres as time permits. (Spring, Summer & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG208 - Introduction to Writing Poetry (3 cr.)

Introduction to the art of writing poetry with emphasis on language, craft and revision. Students will learn and apply the fundamentals of poetry writing, and they will learn how to critique poetry. (Annually). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG209 - Introduction to Writing Fiction (3 cr.)

Introduction to the art of writing fiction with emphasis on language, craft and revision. Students will learn and apply the fundamentals of fiction writing, and they will learn how to critique fiction. (Annually). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG210 - Major English Writers to 1660 (3 cr.)

Introduction to and exploration of major English writers and literary periods before 1660. Readings will characterize significant literary shifts, genres, principal authors, forms, themes, attitudes, and cultural developments. Texts will be discussed as reflections of or responses to changing literary, religious, and political contexts. (Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG211 - Major English Writers since 1660 (3 cr.)

Introduction to and exploration of major English writers and literary periods since 1660 to the mid-twentieth century. Readings will characterize each major period, principal literary figures, forms, themes, attitudes, and cultural developments. Texts will be discussed as reflections of or responses to changing historical, literary, cultural, and political contexts. Liberal arts.

ENG245 - American Drama (3 cr.)

Selected American plays of the 19th and 20th centuries including major figures (O'Neill, Williams, Miller), experimental theatre movements, contemporary playwriting and the musical theatre. (Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG250 - History of Western World Literature I (3 cr.)

Selected literary, philosophical and historical masterpieces of the Western world from ancient times to the early Renaissance. Readings selected on the basis of literary excellence and their influence on the development of Western civilization. (Spring, Summer & Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG251 - History of Western World Literature II (3 cr.)

Selected literary, philosophical, and historical texts of the Western world, from the Renaissance to the present, with readings selected for their literary excellence, formal qualities, and influence on the development of Western literary culture. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

ENG252 - The Bible (3 cr.)

The Bible introduces the student to the historical, literary, and philosophical contexts of this critical text of Western Civilization. A major goal of the class is to help students further appreciate western literature and history through an enriched knowledge of its biblical roots, inspirations, and allusions. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG255 - Literature and Science (3 cr.)

An introduction to literary study and appreciation for the science-minded student. Literary works, forms, conventions, devices, trends, and sensibilities are studied in relationship to the scientific/cultural environments they arise from and respond to. Works studied range from the ancient Greek drama to postmodernism. Poetry, fiction, and drama are included. (Annually). Liberal arts.

ENG262 - The Many Faces of Love (3 cr.)

A Thematic exploration of the variety of literary depictions of love, broadly defined. These include affection, friendship, erotic love, and charity. Liberal arts. (Spring)

ENG270 - Introduction to African American Literature (3 cr.)

Examines the evolution of African American literature, from its roots in Africa and the slave narrative to contemporary African American writers. Considers prevalent patterns and themes, including orality, identity, double-consciousness, etc. as well as the cultural, ethnic, and political positions that inform this tradition. (Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG271 - Latina/o Literature in the U.S. (3 cr.)

An introduction to the literature produced by Latina/o writers in the United States. From a transnational perspective, explores and critically analyzes various issues and themes such as migration, identity and ethnicity, cultural and linguistic hybridity, conflict and resistance, and the Latina/o constructs of urban and rural. These themes will be critically studied across gender, class, and racial lines. (Spring). Liberal arts.

ENG295 - Ancient Myth and Modern Mythmaking (3 cr.)

A study of the ways in which myth has been used throughout history to define, explain and explore human emotions. The course will cover both ancient myths and modern revisions of them. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG297 - Fundamentals of English Language Arts (3 cr.)

This course introduces adolescence education candidates in English language arts to the content knowledge, pedagogical principles, and teacher dispositions necessary to meet NCTE, NYSED, and institutional standards in their field. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101

ENG299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring).

ENG301 - Expository Writing (AWR) (3 cr.)

A course providing extensive writing practice in various modes of discourse with emphasis on improving the student's writing style. Approved AWR. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101, sophomore standing.

ENG302 - Writing Poetry (3 cr.)

Development of skills in the writing of poetry through the study of various forms and the disciplines of using them. Experiments with both traditional and modern. Discussion of all work produced. (Spring). Liberal arts. Approved AWR. Prerequisite: ENG201 or ENG208, and ENG101.

ENG303 - Writing Fiction (3 cr.)

Development of skills in the writing of fiction through the study of literary techniques and the disciplines for using them. Discussion of work produced. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts. Approved AWR. Prerequisite: ENG201 or ENG209, and ENG101.

ENG304 - Professional Writing (3 cr.)

An overview of the rhetorical principles and theoretical concepts behind professional writing, together with practical application in different writing contexts including web and multimedia. Emphasis on research, writing conventions, tone and style, design, formatting, editing, and revision applied to cover letters, resumes, personal statements, abstracts, memos, multi-media presentations, and social media projects. Students will gain professional writing skills applicable to a wide variety of careers. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring/summer). Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG305 - Teaching Writing to Adolescents (3 cr.)

This course connects central theories of composition to the practical action a writing teacher takes in the secondary English classroom (Grades 7-12). Through readings, discussion, and individual and collaborative writing, students heighten their awareness of process and develop an image of the kind of writing teacher they hope to be. Related issues include: designing effective writing assignments, evaluation, peer and teacher conferencing. Students will write in expressive and reflective modes; they will orally synthesize assigned readings on composition theory and pedagogy; and they will design and facilitate a grade-specific writing lesson for the adolescent learner that meets national and state standards. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101 and ENG297.

ENG306 - Topics in Writing (3 cr.)

Special topics in writing; topics vary with each offering. Topics might include writing for regional publications, writing autobiography or popular novel. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG310 - Middle English Literature (3 cr.)

Representative works of English literature from the 13th-15th centuries. Most works will be read in Middle English. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG311 - English Renaissance Writers (3 cr.)

Non-dramatic prose and poetry from the humanists to 1642. Writers considered: Spencer, Sidney, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Jonson, Donne and Bacon. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG312 - Milton (3 cr.)

Poetry and major prose of John Milton, with attention to lesser writers of the Civil Wars and mid-century (Andrew Marvell, John Bunyan, John Donne, Lucy Hutchinson, Richard Baxter, Robert Hooker, and others). Major texts - Areopagitica, Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes - will be considered in their cultural context and in depth. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101, ENG196, sophomore standing.

ENG313 - Eighteenth-Century English Literature I (3 cr.)

This course presents an overview of English literature written during the first half of the long eighteenth century (1660-1714). Major figures include John Dryden, Aphra Behn, Daniel Defoe, Jonathan Swift, Alexander Pope, John Gay, and Lady Mary Wortley Montagu. Because the literature of the period is intricately tied to politics and history, attention will be paid to philosophical, political, and religious issues. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG314 - Eighteenth-Century English Literature II (3 cr.)

This course presents an overview of English literature written during the second half of the long eighteenth century (1714-1800). Selected writers include Fielding, Sterne, Johnson, Goldsmith, Burke, Burney, and Wollstonecraft. Their works will be read in relation to their milieu. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG315 - English Romantic Poetry (3 cr.)

Works of the major Romantic poets--Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley and Keats. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG160 or ENG195 or POI.

ENG316 - Victorian Nonfiction and Poetry (3 cr.)

This course features Victorian writers other than novelists, paying attention to the nonfiction prose of such writers as Ruskin, Carlyle, and Arnold, and the poetry of writers such as Tennyson, the Brownings, and the Rossettis. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101 and ENG195.

ENG318 - Playwriting (3 cr.)

Workshop-environment experience in writing for the stage. Scrutiny of the techniques involved in plot, characterization, dialogue and stage technique. Development of monologues, two-character sketches and extended scripts. Approved AWR. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG321 - Gothic Novel (3 cr.)

This course introduces students to the Gothic novel, a genre that emerged during the eighteenth century in England. The class introduces students to the historical and aesthetic forces shaping the Gothic's treatment of anxiety toward the past represented by the supernatural, by ruins and relics from pre-Reformation England, by Catholics, by monasteries and abbeys, by scheming Machiavels, and by the alien Other. Feminist uses of the Gothic will be explored. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG323 - Topics in Literary Expression (3 cr.)

Significant topics, voices, themes or motifs not likely to be emphasized in standard course offerings. Examples: "Women in Drama," "Nineteenth Century Women Writers," "The Arthurian Legend," "Historical Novel." (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts.

ENG326 - Modern Short Story (3 cr.)

Study of works of short fiction by twentieth-century writers, with special emphasis on work published after World War II. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG330 - Flash Fiction (3 cr.)

Practice in writing very short fiction (1,000 words maximum). Students will read flash fiction and establish a working definition and criteria for its evaluation so that they may write their own pieces. Workshop intensive. Students should have workshop experience and already understand the dynamics of such a classroom setting. (Fall and/or Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG201 or ENG209 or POI.

ENG333 - Writing Creative Non-fiction (3 cr.)

Examination of and practice in writing creative nonfiction, including such forms as personal experience, biographical sketches, personal opinion, reflection, evocations of place, and historical commentary. Liberal arts. Approved AWR. (Fall). Prerequisite: ENG101

ENG338 - Utopias in Literature (3 cr.)

Readings in Utopian and Dystopian literature from Plato to the present with emphasis on the last 100 years. (Spring, Summer & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG339 - Science Fiction (3 cr.)

Science fiction texts and films with emphasis on the treatment of traditional literary themes, the depiction of the human condition, and the exploration of major global issues. (Spring, Summer & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG340 - Literary Criticism (3 cr.)

Introduction to critical theories and application of them to primary texts. Short, frequent essays written from various critical viewpoints. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Approved AWR. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG342 - American Literature to the Civil War (3 cr.)

A study of American literature published before the Civil War; emphasis on six or seven writers such as Cooper, Poe, Douglass, Stowe, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101.

ENG343 - American Literature from the Civil War to World War I (3 cr.)

A study of American Literature published between the Civil War and World War I. The course will cover various genres. Authors vary but may include Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, James, Wharton, DuBois, Jewett, Dreiser, Sui Sin Far, Ruiz de Burton, Zitkala Sa, and Crane. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG346 - 20th Century American Literature to 1960 (3 cr.)

A study of American literature published from 1900 to 1960. The course will cover various genres. Authors vary, but may include Robert Frost, T. S. Eliot, W. C. Williams, Marianne Moore, Langston Hughes, William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Djuna Barnes, Zora Neale Hurston, Flannery O'Connor, James Baldwin, Eugene O'Neill, and Anzia Yezierska. (Fall and/or Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG347 - American Literature Since 1960 (3 cr.)

A study of American literature published since 1960. The course will cover various genres. Authors vary, but may include Paul Auster, Kurt Vonnegut, Toni Morrison, Ishmael Reed, Donald Barthelme, Sandra Cisneros, Amiri Baraka, Maxine Hong Kingston, Cynthia Ozick, and Sherman Alexie. (Fall and/or Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG353 - The Literature of Witness and Trauma (3 cr.)

This course familiarizes students with the "literature of witness" which includes texts that serve as a testimony to traumatic historical events, such as the Holocaust, slavery, "ethnic cleansing," apartheid, etc. Students will discuss, analyze, and write about this literature which expresses the need to remember these events and calls for social and global justice. The works covered in the course represent writers from across the globe and include autobiography, testimonio, novels, drama, poetry, and film. (Fall or Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG355 - Greek Drama in Translation (3 cr.)

Greek drama, its origins, its theatre and its themes. Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides and Aristophanes are considered against the background of 5th and 4th century B.C. Athens; consideration of the meaning of Greek drama for our time. (Summer & Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG363 - Children's Literature (3 cr.)

Literature, traditional and modern, for children from ages three to twelve. Students will study children's literature as a literary genre, exploring the history of the genre and the interaction between audience and text. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG364 - Shakespeare (3 cr.)

Analysis of ten to twelve of Shakespeare's major plays representative of the genres (tragedy, history, comedy, romance) and of the stages in his career as a dramatist. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: junior standing.

ENG365 - Rhetoric and Writing Arts (3 cr.)

This course invites students to contemplate three fundamental questions: What is writing? What is a writer? What does writing do? Explores major ideas concerning written discourse; its rhetorical roots up to the development of composition theory; its variations and functions; issues involving writing aesthetics; the role of literacy, writing and writer in a world increasingly moving from print to multi-media. (At least once per year). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101; one of the following: ENG201, ENG208, or ENG209.

ENG366 - New Media (3 cr.)

This course is designed for students interested in new media as a subject of literary study, a creative medium, and/or the subject of a secondary English Language Arts curriculum. In it, each student cultivates an identity as an informed new media producer-consumer. Students use free software on their own and as a group to create and publish texts on the web. (Once per year). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101, junior standing.

ENG367 - Canadian Fiction (3 cr.)

Canadian novels and short stories written in English, focusing on the great flowering of literature since the 1960's. Typical texts by early, classic writers of this period such as Margaret Atwood, Robertson Davies, Alice Munro, and Mordecai Richler, and more recent writers such as Ann-Marie MacDonald, Wayson Choy, Dareen Greer, Joseph Boyden, Heather O'Neill, and graphic novelist Joe Ollmann. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: ENG101. Liberal arts.

ENG368 - Grammar for Writing (3 cr.)

This course will examine the nature of English syntax and the application of grammatical concepts to written style. In their study of grammatical structures and the reasons for creating and using them, students, as both writers and prospective English language arts educators, will work with grammar as a meaning-making system that integrates function and form for rhetorical effect. (Once per year). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG369 - Autobiographical Writing/Memoir (3 cr.)

This course focuses upon first person texts about personal and family experience, including the personal essay, memoir and the diary/journal. Students will read, discuss, analyze and write in this genre with an emphasis upon various autobiographical styles and modes - from trauma narratives to the humor essay and the keeping of family histories. The works covered in the course represent a broad swath of memoir/autobiographical material and writing styles. Students will seek to locate and develop their own "writer's voice" and story narratives while practicing a variety of memoir strategies. (Once per year). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG371 - Modern American Women Writers (3 cr.)

The works of selected American women writers studied in relation to literary history and to special contexts and developments defining and affecting women's roles in society and the arts. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG374 - Anne Frank: Adolescent Self (3 cr.)

Students will closely read the definitive version of Anne Frank's Diary and examine its lasting impact with critical lenses. Looking backward and forward, they will explore the historical context of the diary and the implications of its future study in the classroom. This course will prompt students to evaluate the merit of Anne Frank's legendary and iconic status. The readings should elicit informed oral and written responses on the following questions: How has Anne Frank come to represent the lost potential of the murdered children of her generation? How does she provide for us an intimate account of female adolescent development? How does Anne Frank offer us a unique profile of an emerging writer that can serve as a model to other adolescents? (Once Every 1-2 Years). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG375 - Literature for Classroom Teachers (3 cr.)

This course combines a study of current trends, theory, practices, and methods in English Language Arts with a strong foundation in literature: discipline-specific discourse, theory, and critical thinking/analysis. Also instructs candidates in how to apply state, professional, and institutional standards to teaching. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG305.

ENG376 - Reading the Jewish Tradition (3 cr.)

Jews refer to themselves as "am hasefer" or "people of the book." In this course we take that self-description literally, studying a select body of literature that both informs and defines the Jewish experience. This course will include texts from ancient to modern, exploring the themes of storytelling in Talmus/Midrash; folkloric storytelling; the immigrant experience; humor; family; feminism and love. Authors may vary but will likely always include Isaac Babel, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Cynthia Ozick, Michael Chabon, Chaim Potok, Allegra Goodman, Henry Roth, and poets Yehuda Halevi and Yehuda Amichai. (Once Every Two Years). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG382 - Longfellow: Poetry & Prosody (3 cr.)

An in-depth study of the poetry of Longfellow and American prosody. Works studied include both major (Evangeline, The Song of Hiawatha, "The Courtship of Miles Standish") and minor ("Paul Revere's Ride," "The Building of the Ship," "The Slave's Dream") poems. Attention paid both to his subject matter as a thinker on cultural and personal themes and to his craft as a poet. (Annually). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101

ENG383 - Dickens (3 cr.)

An in-depth study focusing on Dickens's novels, short novels and journalism. Works studied include the longer novels, such as Bleak House, and short novels, such as A Christmas Carol. Dickens's journalistic work will also be studied. Attention paid to content, craft, and historical background. (Every Other Year). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG195

ENG384 - Jane Austen (3 cr.)

An examination of the six mature novels of Jane Austen and their context, with attention to Austen's style, her narrative voice, and her satire. (Once every one to two years). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101 and ENG195.

ENG389 - Major Authors and Their Craft (3 cr.)

A critical examination of significant works produced by one or two writers in any genre. Special attention to writerly issues, including manipulation of conventions, influence on other writers, popular and critical reception of works, and textual revision. Attention to writers as self-conscious literary craftspersons. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits for credit with different authors. (At least once per year). Prerequisites: ENG101 and Junior standing. Liberal arts.

ENG390 - Theories and Practices of Writing Tutoring (3 cr.)

This course focuses on an exploration and application of theories and practices of writing and writing tutoring. Through critical reflections on essays regarding rhetoric and composition studies and writing tutoring theory and practices, students will begin to formulate their own writing tutoring philosophies. At least seven hours of observation of tutoring in the Learning Center is required. This course can only be taken once and is a prerequisite to becoming a writing tutor in the Claude J. Clark Learning Center. Successful completion of this course meets all of the training requirements for CRLA Level III Master Tutor certification. (Fall). Prerequisites: ENG101.

ENG398 - Internship: Saranac Review (1 to 3 cr.)

Allows and facilitates students to gain practical experience from working on the staff of the Saranac Review, a literary journal dedicated to publishing poetry, nonfiction, and fiction. As part of the internship, students would gain experience as editorial assistants. Their duties include logging and tracking manuscripts, reading and screening manuscripts, and performing other editorial and administrative tasks. Some work hours are expected to be worked in the Saranac Review office. May be repeated for up to six credits. (At least once per year). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101; minimum of junior standing, POI.

ENG399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring & Fall).

ENG406 - Advanced Poetry Writing (3 cr.)

Developing advanced skills in the writing of poetry, with special emphasis on developing personal voice and style. Peer review and discussion of all works written. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG302, POI.

ENG407 - Advanced Fiction Writing (3 cr.)

Developing advanced skills in the writing of fiction, with special emphasis on developing personal voice and style. Peer review and discussion of all works written. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG303, POI.

ENG408 - Literary Magazine Workshop (3 cr.)

A production-oriented course, in which students will explore bookmaking for the literary market. The course is designed to introduce students to all aspects related to literary magazine production. Students will produce an annual issue of Z-Platt, the student literary magazine. (Once per year). Prerequisites: ENG101, junior standing and POI.

ENG410 - Early American Literature (3 cr.)

Selected American authors from the earliest colonizers to the early 19th century. Emphasis: Ann Bradstreet, Edward Taylor, Cotton Mather, William Byrd II, Jonathan Edwards, Benjamin Franklin, Phyllis Wheatley and Charles Brockden Brown. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: three literature credits, junior standing.

ENG412 - 19th Century British Novel (3 cr.)

The nineteenth-century novel from Austen to Hardy. Students will engage in close reading of selected works, with emphasis on the genre of the novel and on 19th century culture and society. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101 and ENG195.

ENG413 - 20th-Century English Novel (3 cr.)

Chronological study of the British novel from the Edwardian period to the present. Readings drawn from the major writers with emphasis on analysis. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: six literature credits.

ENG414 - Modern English Poetry (3 cr.)

Representative works of such modern poets as Auden, Hardy, Housman, Owen, Sitwell, Thomas and Yeats. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG160 or ENG195 or POI.

ENG421 - Chaucer (3 cr.)

Close reading of Chaucer's major poetry, with emphasis on The Canterbury Tales, toward an appreciation of his thought and method. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: three-credit literature course, sophomore standing.

ENG422 - Literature and Global Issues (3 cr.)

Literary responses to major global issues or events; how global social, political, economic or ecological conditions interact with literary imagination. Topics to vary with each offering. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101.

ENG430 - 19th-Century American Novel (3 cr.)

Selected 19th-century American novelists: Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, James, Crane, Norris and Dreiser. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

ENG431 - 20th-Century American Novel (3 cr.)

Study of representative American novels from early Modernism to the present, both major and minor writers; student analysis and discussion. (Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG432 - Modern American Poetry (3 cr.)

Representative works of modern American poets. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG160 or ENG195 or POI.

ENG435 - African American Novel (3 cr.)

Examines the African American novel from its roots in the late 18th century to the present. The objective is to analyze and understand how important artists and works have, along with historical and social forces, influenced the development of the novel. (Spring). Liberal arts.

ENG436 - Latino(a) Fiction (3 cr.)

Major novels and short fiction written by Latino(a) writers. Examines roots and emergence of Latino(a) narrative fiction; role of politics and history; aesthetics; prominent themes and current trends. Attention will be given to critical approaches to this body of work. Authors may include Anaya, Hinojosa, Hijuelos, Cisneros, Ruiz de Burton, Alvarez, Suarez, Tomas Rivera, and Mohr. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101, junior standing.

ENG438 - American Gothic (3 cr.)

A study of the Gothic in American literature and culture from the 18th century to the present including works from authors such as Brown, Hawthorne, Poe, Gilman, James, Wharton, Faulkner, Lovecraft, Jackson, Morrison, and McCarthy. Students will also examine representations of the American Gothic in popular culture including graphic novels and films. Special attention will be paid to the American Gothic as a reflection of the culture's anxiety concerning history; gender; race and ethnicity; science and technology; and nature. (Once Every Two Years). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG439 - Topical Studies in American Literature (3 cr.)

Studies in diverse American literature topics; topics vary with each offering and may include a national or ethnic literature, literary movement, period, genre, theme or motif, a major author, group of authors, or critical approach. May be repeated for credit as topics change. (Spring, Summer & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: junior standing and ENG195 or ENG196 or POI.

ENG443 - Seminar in Contemporary Literature (3 cr.)

A critical examination of significant works produced in the last two decades by writers influencing the contemporary international literary scene. The reading will cover all genres. (At least once per year). Prerequisites: ENG101 and junior standing. Liberal arts.

ENG444 - Arthurian Legend (3 cr.)

Literature dealing with King Arthur and his knights, from the 12th century to the 15th and beyond. The instructor may trace the evolution of the Arthurian legend from the Middle Ages to the present or may choose to focus primarily on the medieval legend. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG448 - Irish Literature (3 cr.)

Survey of Irish literature from the Irish Literary Revival (ca. 1890) to the present. All genres represented with special consideration of the works of Yeats, Synge, Joyce, O'Casey, and Trevor and of the historical and cultural context of Irish literature. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101.

ENG449 - Topical Studies in British Literature (3 cr.)

Studies in diverse British literature topics; topics change with each offering and may include a literary movement, period, genre, theme or motif, a major author, group of authors, or critical approach. May be repeated for credit as topics change. (Summer & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: junior standing and ENG195 or ENG196 or POI.

ENG456 - Modern Drama: 1880 to 1925 (3 cr.)

British and continental drama from the height of the Victorian era; through Ibsen and the coming of realism; the emergence of expressionism in the war years; and the progression to the avant-garde of the 1920s. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101 and either THE110 or ENG195, or POI.

ENG457 - World Drama Since 1925 (3 cr.)

British and continental drama focusing on such phenomena as epic theatre, the absurdists, theatre of cruelty, agit-prop drama and multimedia experiments. Playwrights studied: Brecht, Durrenmatt, Beckett, Genet and Weiss. (Spring). Liberal arts.

ENG459 - Topical Studies in World Literature (3 cr.)

Studies in diverse World (non-British Isles, American or Canadian) literature topics; topics vary with each offering and may include a national or ethnic literature, literary movement, period, genre, theme or motif, a major author, group of authors, or critical approach. May be repeated for credit as topics change. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: junior standing and ENG195 or ENG196 or POI.

ENG461 - Young Adult Literature (3 cr.)

An exploration of significant fiction written for young adults aged 12 to 18. Issues include literary evaluation criteria, literary themes and issues, and societal pressures upon content and form. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101 and ENG195.

ENG462 - Young Adult Science Fiction (3 cr.)

Significant works of science fiction and related speculative fiction written for the young adult audience. Issues include apocalypse, coming of age, futurism, posthumanity, power relationships, social and environmental responsibility, utopia/dystopia. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101 and a course in literature.

ENG480 - The Stratford Experience (1 cr.)

Students will study Shakespeare, the history of the Stratford Festival, and travel to Stratford, Ontario to watch the Stratford Shakespeare Festival's performances of his plays. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG495 - Advanced Honors Project (3 cr.)

Significant undertaking written and produced under the direction of a faculty mentor. Project will consist of written criticism or research or a body of creative, expository or journalistic writing; may include photographic or other media displays as appropriate; optional oral presentation. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG494 or JOU494, permission of department chairperson.

ENG496 - Instructional Practicum (1 to 3 cr.)

Supervised tutoring or classroom instructional assistance in the Learning Center or an English/journalism course. A contract specifying each student's duties, approved by the course coordinator, will be on file in the department. Can be repeated to a maximum of six credits. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG305 or ENG390 is recommended.

ENG499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring, Summer & Fall).

ENG516 - Chaucer (3 cr.)

Selected works of Chaucer, with emphasis on The Canterbury Tales. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG521 - Modern American Novel (3 cr.)

Intensive study of selected twentieth century American novelists such as Dreiser, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, and selected post-World War II authors. (Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG539 - Science Fiction (3 cr.)

Topics in science fiction studies, including history of the genre, major authors (Asimov, Bradbury, Clarke) and themes (alien encounters, genetic engineering, nuclear holocaust.) (Spring, Summer & Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG548 - Irish Writers (3 cr.)

Survey of Irish literature from the Irish Literary Revival (ca. 1890) to the present. All genres represented with special consideration of the works of Yeats, Synge, Joyce, O'Casey, and Trevor as well as contemporary women writers; the historical and cultural context of Irish literature; relationship between literature and other art forms, such as film and music. (Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG561 - Young Adult Fiction (3 cr.)

An exploration of significant fiction written for the young adult audience. Issues include literary evaluation criteria, literary themes and issues, and societal pressures upon content and form. (Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG568 - Contemporary Short Fiction (3 cr.)

Arbitrarily defining contemporary short fiction as fiction published after World War II, the course will include short-fiction writers whose work has been published within the last thirty years. International in scope; major emphasis, however, will be on American Writers of the 1960s and 70s. Included will be such writers as John Updike, Donald Barthelme, Jorges Luis Borges, Flannery O'Connor, Leonard Michaels, Bernard Malamud, Isaac Singer, Julio Cortazar, Robert Coover, Italo Calvino, Joyce Carol Oates, and others. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

ENG586 - Seminar in English Studies (3 cr.)

A selected topic, focusing on literature, writing, rhetoric, or English adolescent education. Emphasis on student research and analysis in a seminar format. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. (Spring, Summer & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Qualified senior undergraduates admitted with permission of the instructor.

ENG587 - Topics in American Literature (3 cr.)

Special offerings in American Literature, involving major authors (Hawthorne, Hemingway), regional literature (Southern Writers to 1940), or themes (Capitalism in American Literature). May be repeated twice for credit with different topics. (Spring, Summer & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Qualified senior undergraduates admitted with permission of the instructor.

ENG588 - Topics in British Literature (3 cr.)

Special offerings in British literature, including major authors (Dickens, Joyce), genre topics (Metaphysical Poetry), themes (Industrial Revolution in British Literature). May be repeated for credit with different topics. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Qualified senior undergraduates admitted with permission of the instructor.

ENG589 - Topics in Comparative Literature (3 cr.)

Special offerings in world literature, including major authors (Tolstoy and Dostoevsky, Hesse), national literature topics (19th Century French or Russian novel), or themes (Romanticism). May be repeated for credit with different topics. (Spring, Summer & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Qualified senior undergraduates admitted with permission of the instructor.

ENG599 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring, Summer & Fall).

Search the College Course Catalog

Enter a course number or three-letter curriculum code to search the College Catalog:

Alphabetical Listing of Curriculum Descriptions by Course Subject

A

  • Africana Studies = AAS
  • Accounting = ACC
  • Anthropology = ANT
  • Arabic = ARA
  • Art = ART
  • Asian Studies = ASI
  • Astronomy = AST

B

  • Biology = BIO
  • Business = BUS

C

  • Canadian Studies = CAS
  • Communications Disorders & Sciences = CDS
  • Consumer Economics Management = CEM
  • Chemistry = CHE
  • Counseling = CLG
  • Career Life Planning = CLP
  • Communication Studies = CMM
  • Computer Science = CSC
  • Criminal Justice = CRI

E

  • Economics = ECO
  • Education = EDU
  • Education - Administration = EDA
  • Education - Mathematics = EDM
  • Education - Reading = EDR
  • Education - Special = EDS
  • English = ENG
  • Environmental Science = ENV
  • English as a Second Language = ESL
  • Expeditionary Studies = EXP

F

  • Finance = FIN
  • Foreign Languages & Literature = FLL
  • French = FRE
  • Freshman Seminar = FRS
  • Freshman Experience = FRX

G

  • Geography = GEG
  • Gender & Women's Studies = GWS
  • Geology = GEL
  • German = GER

H

  • Health Education = HED
  • History = HIS
  • Honors = HON
  • Hotel, Restaurant, & Tourism Management = HRT
  • Human Development and Family Relations = HDF

I

  • Interdisciplinary Studies = INT
  • Italian = ITA

J

  • Journalism = JOU

L

  • Latin American Studies = LAS
  • Latin = LAT
  • Leadership = MLS
  • Library Skills = LIB
  • Language & Linguistics = LIN

M

  • Mathematics = MAT
  • Meteorology = MET
  • Military Studies = MTS
  • Management & International Business = MGM
  • Marketing & Entrepreneurship = MKE
  • Minority Studies = MNS
  • Music = MUS

N

  • Nursing = NUR
  • Nutrition = FNI

P

  • Physical Education = PED
  • Philosophy = PHI
  • Physics = PHY
  • Portuguese = POR
  • Political Science = PSC
  • Psychology = PSY

R

  • Reading = RDG
  • Recreation = REC
  • Russian = RUS

S

  • Science & Society = SCI
  • Sociology = SOC
  • Spanish = SPA
  • Social Work = SWK

T

  • Theatre = THE
  • Tutor Training = TTR