BIO Courses

BIO100 - Concepts in Biology (4 cr.)

Main concepts in biology with particular reference to human biology. Significance of these concepts to human life and their impact upon society. For non-science majors only. Lecture and laboratory. Cannot be taken in addition to BIO101 or BIO103 for credit. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

BIO101 - General Biology I (4 cr.)

Fundamental principles of biology at the molecular and cellular level are considered beginning with the chemical basis of life and including cell organization, membrane physiology, photosynthesis, respiration and aspects of genetics, immunology and development. Lecture/laboratory. BIO101 and BIO102 may be taken in any order. Cannot be taken in addition to BIO100 or BIO103 for credit. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts.

BIO102 - General Biology II (4 cr.)

An introduction to the study of fundamental processes of living organisms. The structure, function, ecological interrelationships and evolution of organisms are considered. Cannot be taken in addition to BIO105 for credit Lecture/laboratory. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts.

BIO103 - Concepts in Biology Without Lab (3 cr.)

Main concepts in biology are discussed with particular reference to human biology. Significance of these concepts to human life and their impact on society. An introductory course without labs, designed for non-science majors. Cannot be taken in addition to BIO 100 or BIO 101 for credit. Cannot be used as a prereq for any course in biology. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts.

BIO106 - Epidemic! (1 cr.)

An introduction to Epidemics. What are epidemics and how are they controlled? Topics include human pathogens, the process of disease, and how diseases are fought. We will introduce the history of epidemics using Spanish Flu and the Irish Potato famine as socially and medically important events. Bioterrorism and new emerging infectious diseases, including AIDs, show that the study of epidemics is not just about the past. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG 101 (may be taken concurrently).

BIO113 - Pharmacology of Illicit Drugs (3 cr.)

Explores the ways that recreational and illicit drugs interact with the human body. A background in cell biology and nerve physiology will be provided, followed by discussions of specific drugs of abuse and their physical and psychological effects. This course is intended for a non-biology audience and cannot be used for elective credit in biology. (Summer/Winter/Every Other Fall). Liberal arts.

BIO114 - Introduction to the Health Professions (1 cr.)

This course is intended to provide a survey of the options available in the field of health care. Each week a different health care practitioner from the area will give a 30-40 minute talk followed by a question-and-answer period. Typical presentations will be by a general practice M.D., an M.D. in a specialty (e.g., OB/GYN), a pharmacist, a physical therapist, a dentist, physician's assistant, a medical technologist/cytotechnologist, a nurse, a nurse practitioner, a veterinarian, an athletic trainer, and a chiropractor. The purpose of the course is to provide students interested in health care an opportunity to explore the different fields available. (Every other spring). Liberal arts.

BIO120 - Human Biology (3 cr.)

An introduction to human anatomy and physiology for the non-science major with emphasis on health. Human genetics, development and aging, disease, and human evolution, and ecology will be covered. (Every Other Year). Liberal arts. Cannot be taken as credit for the biology and nursing majors.

BIO133 - Introduction to Cell Biology (1 cr.)

This course, intended for a non-biology major audience, explores eukaryotic life at the cellular level. Topics covered include the scientific method, biochemical molecules, and reactions and protein production. Cannot be taken in addition to BIO100, BIO101, or BIO103 for credit. Cannot be used as an elective within the biology major or as a prereq for any course in biology. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

BIO134 - Information Flow in Biology (1 cr.)

This course, intended for a non-biology major audience, explores how life uses information and passes it to the next generation. Topics covered include mitotic and meiotic cell division and Mendelian genetics. Cannot be taken in addition to BIO100, BIO101, or BIO103 for credit. Cannot be used as an elective within the biology major or as a prerequisite for any course in biology. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

BIO135 - Introduction to Evolution (1 cr.)

This course, intended for a non-biology major audience, explores how life evolved and continues to evolve. It will begin with a discussion of Charles Darwin and then explain changes in biology from a microevolutionary and macroevolutionary perspective. Cannot be taken in addition to BIO100, BIO101, or BIO103 for credit. Cannot be used as an elective within the biology major or as a prerequisite for any course in biology. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

BIO195 - Undergraduate Research (1 to 6 cr.)

Undergraduate project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts.

BIO199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

BIO202 - Introduction to Microbiology (3 cr.)

Fundamental concepts of Microbiology, including cell structure and function, with an emphasis on Bacteriology. Application of microbiology in health-related fields, including food microbiology, health and disease, and survey of major human pathogens. Cannot be taken in addition to BIO203 for credit. Liberal arts.

BIO203 - Microbiology (4 cr.)

The biology of microorganisms, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, prions, viroids, protozoa, and algae (with a focus on bacteria). The course will introduce fundamental aspects of microorganisms, including their structure, growth, metabolism, genetics, and diversity. The course will then build on these fundamentals to discuss applications of microbiology, including health, disease, food production, industry, ecology, and laboratory methods in microbiology. Lecture/laboratory. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO101 or CHE271.

BIO205 - Introduction to Botany (3 cr.)

Biology, ecology, and evolution of flowering and non-flowering plants; with an emphasis on differences and similarities in anatomy, morphology and reproductive biology among the major groups within the Plant Kingdom. Late-semester field trips. (Every other spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO102 or POI.

BIO208 - Evolution (3 cr.)

Origin and evolution of major groups of organisms, and the genetic and environmental factors involved. Major topics include the origin of life, sources of genetic variation, mechanisms of selection, phylogeny and human evolution. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO102

BIO209 - Vertebrate Zoology (3 cr.)

Survey of the vertebrate animals emphasizing their evolution and diversity. All major vertebrate groups are covered and students learn the defining characteristics of the groups and their ecological and evolutionary relationships. Sample groups are used to illustrate and explore major themes in biology. Course is designed for Biology, Environmental Science and Ecology majors. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO102 or POI.

BIO295 - Undergraduate Research (1 to 6 cr.)

Undergraduate project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts.

BIO299 - Independent Study (0 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

BIO304 - Ecology (4 cr.)

Study of the interactions between organisms and their environments. Topics include the ecological principles of energy flow, biogeochemistry, global climate change, adaptation by individual organisms to their environment, properties of population, community structure and dynamics, ecosystem productivity and functions and review of ecological literature. Laboratory includes field illustrations of ecological habitats, experiences utilizing methods and techniques to conduct ecological measurements, and ecological data analysis. Lecture and laboratory. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO102.

BIO305 - General Genetics (4 cr.)

An overview of the major concepts in genetics will be presented. Topics include: Mendelian genetics, gene interactions, linkage and chromosome mapping, mutations, population genetics and evolution, quantitative inheritance, molecular biology and bacterial genetics. Lecture/laboratory. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: BIO101, CHE112.

BIO310 - Plant Diversity and Evolution (4 cr.)

An exploration of the diversity of plant life on Earth. All major higher plant groups are covered, but the primary focus is on the families of flowering plants. Students will learn to recognize the characteristics of the major families while learning about their distributions, natural history, evolutionary relationships, and ethnobotanical uses. Late-semester field trips will focus on local representatives of families covered in class. Liberal Arts. (Every other Spring Semester). Prerequisites: POI or junior standing, BIO205 and BIO208.

BIO323 - Invertebrate Zoology (3 cr.)

Survey of the invertebrate animals emphasizing their evolution and diversity. All major invertebrate groups are covered and students learn the defining characteristics of the groups and their ecological and evolutionary relationships. Sample groups and dissections are used to illustrate and explore major themes in biology. Course is designed for Biology, Environmental Science and Ecology majors. (Fall, every two years). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO102 or POI.

BIO326 - Human Anatomy & Physiology I (4 cr.)

This course examines the structure and function of the human body at the cellular, histological and gross levels. Systems under study in this first semester of a two semester series include: cellular physiology, epithelial and connective tissues, cartilage and bone, muscle and nervous tissues, sensory systems, and the central nervous system. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CHE271; or CHE111 and BIO101.

BIO327 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4 cr.)

This course examines the structure and function of the human body at the cellular, histological and gross levels. Systems under study in this second semester of a two semester series include: autonomic nervous system, endocrine, cardiovascular, blood, lymphoid, immunity, respiratory, digestion, metabolism, urinary, acid base balance, and reproduction. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO326.

BIO328 - Introduction to Histology (3 cr.)

Histology is the study of tissues. The course combines ideas from basic histotechnology and functional histology, and gives students the opportunity to develop several skills related to tissue slide interpretation. In addition to hands-on experience with microscopes, to study the four major mammalian tissue types and how they associate to form organs, students learn about important technical aspects of histology such as tissue processing, embedding, sectioninng and staining. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO101.

BIO329 - Animal Behavior (3 cr.)

The behavior of non-human animals in their natural habitat and communities, including the genetics, development and ecology of behavior in an evolutionary context. Lecture. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO102.

BIO333 - Biostatistics (3 cr.)

Introduction to statistical analysis of univariate biological data, including: statistics of location and dispersion, analysis of variance (ANOVA), linear regression, correlation, and non-parametric tests. Discussion of experimental design and use of a statistical package for data analysis, followed by interpretation of results. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: a 100-level science course, sophomore standing.

BIO334 - Revolution in Agriculture: Transgenic Plants (3 cr.)

Discussion of plant biology, agriculture and the use of genetically modified plants to provide food, pharmaceuticals and partial independence from pesticide, fertilizer and herbicide use in the 21st century. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: Distributive Natural Science requirement; junior standing.

BIO335 - Extinction (3 cr.)

Discussion of the Biodiversity Crisis and the Concept of the Minimum Viable Population in light of both human induced and natural biological and physical causes for extinction. Survey of the process of extinction ranging from recent extinctions of individual species to mass extinction events in the fossil record. Examines the controversies over the importance of these forcing mechanisms on a global scale and as models for human induced disturbance of the biosphere. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: an introductory course in Biology, Environmental Science, or Geology.

BIO336 - Ecophysiology (3 cr.)

An introduction to the fundamental mechanisms of animal adaptation to environmental variables. The problems of size and scale will be investigated as they relate to central issues in comparative physiology. How animals cope with marine and terrestrial environments, including extreme environments will be considered. (Summer/Winter sessions online; once every two to three years Spring or Fall classroom). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: BIO101 and BIO102.

BIO337 - Introduction to Clinical Practices (1 cr.)

A survey of selected subjects in medicine. The course is intended for students considering a career in health fields. There are five three-hour sessions, each focusing on an area of clinical medicine in which the general public has some awareness. Topics include Advanced Cardiac Life Support, Pregnancy, Labor and Delivery, Trauma Resuscitation and Infectious Disease. The goal of each session is to expose the student to current medical practices and procedures to help them determine their career goals. Liberal arts. (Spring). Prerequisites: BIO101, BIO102, or CHE111 (can be taken concurrently).

BIO339 - The Biology of Aging (3 cr.)

Comprehensive review of the current evolutionary and biochemical theories of aging includes general theoretical background of aging and current research on molecular theories and proposed pharmacological interventions in aging. Includes a laboratory component exploring aging in a model. Liberal arts. (Spring). Prerequisites: BIO305 (CHE371 recommended).

BIO340 - Bioethics (3 cr.)

An introduction to ethics and decision making, especially in relation to issues stemming from developments in modern biology and the impacts of technology. Emphasis is on using case studies to understand and apply ethical theory and principles. Liberal arts. (Fall or Spring). Prerequisites: BIO305 or POI.

BIO341 - DNA and Bioinformatics (3 cr.)

Bioinformatics merges the fields of biology, informational technology and computer sciences into a single discipline. The students will conduct DNA and protein experiments, then use computers for the retrieval, storage, and analysis of their results and biological information that has been stored in large databanks. (Every Other Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: BIO305 and CHE112.

BIO345 - Field Botany (3 cr.)

Outdoor field complement to lecture-and lab-based botany coursework offered in Biological Sciences. Weekly excursions to local natural areas include on-site lessons on the identification and taxonomy of the North Country flora. Key concepts covered include plant/animal coadaptations, plant community dynamics, and the interactions between native and exotic species. (Every other Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: POI or Junior standing, BIO205.

BIO370 - Biodiversity of Australia (3 cr.)

A student-driven exploration of Australia's most notable organisms. Each student will learn about general concepts on the origins, biogeography, and ecology of the Australian flora and fauna through reading/writing assignments and a term paper constituting a review of the current literature on a species/group. (every other summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: BIO102 and BIO/ENV304 or POI.

BIO380 - Communicating Biology (3 cr.)

The techniques of communicating biology through written, oral, and graphical methods. Emphasis is placed on students developing strong critical thinking, writing, and oral communication skills. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Approved AWR. Prerequisites: BIO101, BIO102, ENG101, junior standing.

BIO385 - Topics in Biology I (1 or 2 cr.)

Emphasis on topics of current, high interest in biology which are not covered extensively in other biology courses. The course will meet for three one-hour lecture periods, or the equivalent, weekly for five weeks. May be repeated. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO101 or BIO102.

BIO386 - Topics in Biology II (2 cr.)

Topics of current interest in biology which are not covered extensively in other biology courses. Three one-hour lectures, or one three-hour laboratory or the equivalent, weekly for ten weeks. May be repeated. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO101 or BIO102.

BIO387 - Topics in Biology III (3 cr.)

Topics of current interest in biology which are not covered extensively in other biology courses. Three one-hour lectures, or one 3-hour laboratory, or the equivalent, weekly for the full semester. May be repeated. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO101 or BIO102.

BIO395 - Undergraduate Research (1 to 6 cr.)

Undergraduate project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts.

BIO396 - Independent Study (1 to 3 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

BIO399 - Independent Study (0 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

BIO401 - Cell Biology (4 cr.)

Structure and function of the cell. Emphasis is placed on biochemical reactions that control cell function and the integration of cell function into the physiology of multicellular organisms. Topics include cytoskeletal structure, membranes, signal transduction, movement and cellular reproduction. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: BIO101 and BIO305.

BIO406 - Medical Microbiology (3 cr.)

Biology of pathogenic microorganisms, their isolation and identification; computer studies of epidemiological patterns of microbial diseases. Lecture/laboratory. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: BIO203, a CHE course.

BIO407 - Immunology (3 cr.)

Principles of host defense mechanisms, both innate and acquired. Cell development and cooperation in immune reactions. Immunogenetics. Antigen-Antibody interactions and clinical applications. Immune dysfunctions of Hypersentitivies (allergies and autoimmunities) and Immunodeficiencies (primary and secondary). The role of the immune system in AIDS, transplants, cancer and immune responses to infectious disease. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: BIO203, BIO305, CHE242; (BIO401 and CHE371 or CHE401 recommended).

BIO411 - Plant Physiology (4 cr.)

The structure of the plant cell, plant biochemistry and metabolism, and plant growth and development. Lecture/laboratory. Liberal arts. (Fall). Prerequisites: CHE371 or CHE401; PHY103 or PHY111; MAT131 or MAT161 or BIO333.

BIO417 - Biology of Cancer (3 cr.)

Cancer is a disease of cell division control. This course provides an understanding of the molecular mechanisms that control the cellular decision to divide and the DNA mutations that lead to a loss of this control (i.e., cancer). An emphasis is placed on signal transduction mechanisms of mitogens, cell cycle machinery (pRb, E2F, cyclins and CDKs), cell cycle inhibitors, and mechanisms promoting and inhibiting apoptosis. These topics are placed in the context of their exploitation by cancer cells. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO401.

BIO421 - Principles of Animal Physiology (4 cr.)

Control of the internal environment of invertebrate and vertebrate animals by the nervous, endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, excretory and other organ systems. Lecture/laboratory. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: BIO102; CHE112; PHY101 or PHY111.

BIO424 - Cardiovascular Pharmacology (3 cr.)

An introduction to the physiology and pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system, including pharmacological treatments of disease processes. The class includes lectures, group workshops, and journal article discussions. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO401 or BIO421.

BIO481 - Conservation Biology (3 cr.)

Application of ecological theory to managing Earth's living resources, with explicit reference to social, political, and ethical considerations. Biodiversity, metapopulations, and restoration biology are explored through lectures, journal readings, and case studies that develop professional skills and judgment. One required weekend field trip. (Annually). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO304 or ENV304.

BIO490 - Cellular Biochemistry Research Experience (15 cr.)

A full-semester research course covering aspects of cellular and molecular biology. The focus of the course will highlight the research interests of the participating faculty. Skills, techniques and instrumentation required for the semester's research are introduced and covered. Success in research requires the ability to ask the right questions and recognize important information obtained through experimentation. This program embraces the essence of scientific method and fosters acquisition and application of knowledge to problem-solving, formation and testing of hypotheses and collection and analysis of results through observation and experimentation. Course instruction includes participation of visiting scientists. Open to all science students regardless of major. (Spring). Liberal arts. Approved AWR. Prerequisites: BIO305, CHE112, ENG101, junior standing.

BIO495 - Undergraduate Research (1 to 6 cr.)

Undergraduate project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts.

BIO496 - Laboratory Teaching Experience (1 to 3 cr.)

Planning, preparation, class demonstration and teaching in various biology laboratory sections. May not be repeated. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: senior standing, permission of the instructor and chairperson, a minimum 2.5 GPA.

BIO499 - Independent Study (0 to 12 cr.)

Undergraduate project individually arranged by student and faculty member. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts.

BIO510 - Plant Diversity and Evolution (4 cr.)

An exploration of the diversity of plant life on earth. All major higher plant groups are covered, but the primary focus is on the families of flowering plants. Students will learn to recognize the characteristics of the major families while learning about their distributions, natural history, evolutionary relationships, and ethnobotanical uses. Late-semester field trips will focus on local representatives of families covered in class. Students who have received credit for BIO310 may not receive credit for BIO510. (Every other spring semester). Liberal arts.

BIO525 - Cardiovascular Pharmacology (3 cr.)

A study of pharmacological treatments of cardiovascular disease processes, based on the physiology and pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system. This will include classical pharmacology (dose/response relationships, radioligand binding studies), receptor pharmacology, hemodynamics (cardiac output, vascular resistance, etc.) and major disease processes (e.g., hypertension, arteriosclerosis, and congestive heart failure). The class includes lectures, group workshops, and journal article discussions. Students who have received credit for BIO424 may not receive credit for BIO525. (Every other Fall). Prerequisite: BIO401 or BIO421.

BIO545 - Graduate Field Botany (3 cr.)

Outdoor field experience in botanical science to complement lab-and-lecture-based graduate-level coursework in organismal biology. Weekly excursions to local natural areas include on-site lessons on the identification and taxonomy of the North Country flora. Key concepts covered include plant/animal coadaptations, plant community dynamics, and the interactions between native and exotic species. Students who have received credit for BIO345 may not receive credit for BIO545. (Every other Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: graduate standing or POI.

BIO581 - Conservation Biology (3 cr.)

Application of ecological theory to managing earth's living resources, with explicit reference to social, political, and ethical considerations. Biodiversity, metapopulations, and restoration biology are explored through lectures, journal readings, and case studies that develop professional skills and judgement. Graduate enrollees will co-host visiting conservation scientists, act as leaders in group discussions, and attend weekly group discussions in addition to class meetings. Students who have received credit for BIO481 may not receive credit for BIO581. (every other fall/spring). Prerequisites: graduate standing or POI.

BIO587 - Topics in Biology III (3 cr.)

Topics of current interest in biology which are not covered extensively in other biology courses. Three lecture (1 hour periods, or one laboratory (3 hours) period or the equivalent thereof weekly for the full semester. Students who register for BIO587 will be required to complete additional course work beyond the requirements of BIO387. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite(s): BIO101, BIO102.

BIO595 - Graduate Research (2 to 7 cr.)

Graduate research program leading toward a dissertation.

BIO599 - Graduate Independent Study (1 to 7 cr.)

Non-research project or study individually arranged between student and sponsoring faculty member. (Note: BIO599 not for dissertation.)

Search the College Course Catalog

Enter a course number or three-letter course subject to search the College Catalog:

Alphabetical Listing of Curriculum Descriptions by Course Subject

A

  • Africana Studies = AAS
  • Accounting = ACC
  • Anthropology = ANT
  • Arabic = ARA
  • Art = ART
  • Asian Studies = ASI
  • Astronomy = AST

B

  • Biology = BIO
  • Business = BUS

C

  • Canadian Studies = CAS
  • Communications Disorders & Sciences = CDS
  • Consumer Economics Management = CEM
  • Chemistry = CHE
  • Counseling = CLG
  • Career Life Planning = CLP
  • Communication Studies = CMM
  • Computer Science = CSC
  • Criminal Justice = CRI

E

  • Economics = ECO
  • Education = EDU
  • Education - Administration = EDA
  • Education - Mathematics = EDM
  • Education - Reading = EDR
  • Education - Special = EDS
  • English = ENG
  • Environmental Science = ENV
  • English as a Second Language = ESL
  • Expeditionary Studies = EXP

F

  • Finance = FIN
  • Foreign Languages & Literature = FLL
  • French = FRE
  • Freshman Seminar = FRS
  • Freshman Experience = FRX

G

  • Geography = GEG
  • Gender & Women's Studies = GWS
  • Geology = GEL
  • German = GER

H

  • Health Education = HED
  • History = HIS
  • Honors = HON
  • Hotel, Restaurant, & Tourism Management = HRT
  • Human Development and Family Relations = HDF

I

  • Interdisciplinary Studies = INT
  • Italian = ITA

J

  • Journalism = JOU

L

  • Latin American Studies = LAS
  • Latin = LAT
  • Leadership = MLS
  • Library Skills = LIB
  • Language & Linguistics = LIN

M

  • Mathematics = MAT
  • Meteorology = MET
  • Military Studies = MTS
  • Management & International Business = MGM
  • Marketing & Entrepreneurship = MKE
  • Minority Studies = MNS
  • Music = MUS

N

  • Nursing = NUR
  • Nutrition = FNI

P

  • Physical Education = PED
  • Philosophy = PHI
  • Physics = PHY
  • Portuguese = POR
  • Political Science = PSC
  • Psychology = PSY

R

  • Reading = RDG
  • Recreation = REC
  • Russian = RUS

S

  • Science & Society = SCI
  • Sociology = SOC
  • Spanish = SPA
  • Social Work = SWK

T

  • Theatre = THE
  • Tutor Training = TTR