Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure Plan

SOP Number 17.002
Effective Date: May 12, 2004
Review Date: July 15, 2005
Replaces: 17.001
Reviewed by: AES Northeast

General Requirements

The bulk storage of petroleum products at Plattsburgh State University is monitored and inspected regularly to minimize the chance of a spill, in accordance with 6 NYCRR Part 611 and Part 613 and Federal Register Part 112.7 (a)(1) - Oil Pollution Prevention. The following plan discusses our facility's conformance with the requirements outlined in the State and Federal codes.

Physical Layout

The Service Compound contains the two 30,000-gallon underground fuel tanks for the Central Heating Plant and the gas and diesel tanks, which have their own secondary containment. The diesel tank is a 500-gallon above ground tank located between the Central Heating Plant and the Service Building in a containment structure. The unleaded gas tank is 4,000 gallons and located above ground in the same structure. A copy of the facility diagram is attached. See Table below for types of oil in each container and storage capacities.

Tank # Installed Location Type Capacity Product Area
1 Jul-92 Above Ground Steel 400 Unleaded Gas Service Compound
2 Aug-92 Above Ground Steel 500 Diesel Service Compound
3A Sep-98 Underground Fiberglass 30,000 #2 Fuel oil CHP
4A Sep-98 Underground Fiberglass 30,000 #2 Fuel oil CHP
5A Jul-02 Above Ground Steel 120 Diesel Banks
6A Jul-02 Above Ground Steel 120 Diesel Whiteface
7A Jul-02 Above Ground Steel 120 Diesel Algonquin
8A Jul-02 Above Ground Steel 120 Diesel Adirondack
9 Jul-02 Above Ground Steel 120 Diesel Kehoe
10A Jul-02 Above Ground Steel 120 Diesel Beaumont
11 Jul-02 Above Ground Steel 120 Diesel Infirmary
12A Oct-94 Above Ground Steel 160 #2 Fuel oil 133 Court
12B Oct-94 Above Ground Steel 160 #2 Fuel oil 133 Court
12C Oct-94 Above Ground Steel 160 #2 Fuel oil 133 Court
13 Mar-87 Above Ground Steel 275 #2 Fuel oil 134 Court
13A Mar-87 Above Ground Steel 275 #2 Fuel oil 134 Court
14A Jul-02 Above Ground Steel 120 Diesel Wilson
15 Oct-92 Above Ground Steel 160 Kerosene Service Compound

Discharge Prevention Measures

Inspections

  • The Central Heating Plant personnel monitor the fuel pumping equipment along with all the piping runs. Readings and inspections occur every four hours around the clock.
  • The gas and diesel tanks are metered through dispersion pumps. The tanks are also physically measured daily Monday thru Friday and the gallons are compared to metered inventory to detect any discrepancy.
  • The 30,000-gallon tank at the Central Heating Plant is equipped with a high-level alarm, both audible and visual.

Transfer and Piping Protection (As per Part 613.3)

  • The fills for the in-ground 30,000-gallon tanks are mounted in the tank containment system. They are protected from damage by balusters that prevent vehicular traffic from contacting the fill port containment area.
  • The gas and diesel tank fills are located on the tanks in the Service Compound area. The vents are mounted on the side of the containment structure. The distribution pumps for these fuels are located in and protected by the 18" poured concrete containment.

Containment (As per Part 611.3)

  • The two 30,000 gallon fuel tanks at the Central Heating Plant have their own secondary containment. This containment is alarmed so that any tank leakage will be immediately known. The Auto-Stik JR2 gives continuous product readings on both tanks.
  • The fill areas of these tanks are connected directly to the secondary containment for the tanks. Any fill connection spill to these tanks will be contained in this area.
  • The gas and diesel tanks are contained in an area 21'6" x 14'6", surrounded by an impervious concrete wall to the height of 18".

Bulk Storage and Secondary Containment

  • The two 30,000 gallon tanks at the Central Heating Plant are double walled fiberglass, with leak detection installed.
  • The gas and diesel tanks are steel construction, coated with an anti corrosion substance. These tanks are properly vented for above ground storage and are completely contained in an impervious walled containment.

Containment Drainage

The secondary containment area for the gas and diesel tanks is covered to prevent water buildup. A sump pit is available for pump installation to pump water infiltration to the municipal sanitary sewer system.

Countermeasures

If a spill were to occur in an area outside of secondary containment, there is sufficient manpower and equipment on hand around the clock to minimize the potentially affected areas.

  • The Central Heating Plant is manned 24-hours/day seven days/week by a minimum of three men.
  • Equipment available to those called on the emergency list consists of two bucket loaders and combination bucket backhoe, stored in the Service Building Compound immediately adjacent to the Central Heating Plant. Several dump trucks are also stored with this equipment. The keys are in the garage by the closet.
  • There is a large supply of sand available on campus that could be used for diking or absorption.
  • The warehouse, also adjacent to the Service Compound, has a large supply of speedy-dry, a highly absorbent material for handling spills.
  • Located at the Central Heating Plant and available to the shift supervisor is a list of all personnel on the Central Heating Plant and Maintenance and Operations roster. Any or all of these personnel will respond to a spill emergency.
  • The Environmental Health Officer is designated as the spill response coordinator.
  • Numbers are available in the Central Heating Plant to contact:
    • Spill Response coordinator
    • DEC spill hot line
    • Fire Department (if necessary)
    • Spill clean-up contractor

Emergency response time by campus personnel will range from fifteen minutes to one hour. Emergency response by Op-Tech will range from one to three hours.

Emergency Telephone List

  • Ed Bortnick (EHO) - 643-9375
  • Jim Fezette (PUE III) - 593-7738
  • Howard Plumadore (PUE II) 643-6753
  • Kevin Soucia (Grounds Supervisor) - 569-4740
  • Kevin Roberts (Maint. Supervisor II) - 643-2679
  • Gil Jock (Maint. Supervisor I) - 293-7988
  • Op-Tech - 1-800-225-6750

Potential Discharges

  • Transfer operations hold the largest chance for spill accidents. The tank fills for the two 30,000 gallon underground #2 storage tanks are in the west area behind the Central Heating Plant in the service compound.
    • The worst-case scenario for this area would be a tank truck rupture. The fuel trucks carry 10,000 gallons of Number Two fuel. A spill of this magnitude would lie on the asphalt in this area. Flow would tend to be southerly and easterly towards main driveway areas, which are all paved. The drains are connected to the City of Plattsburgh Sanitary Sewer System.
    • A hose break unnoticed by the plant operator or truck driver would cause a spill that would cover the same area and flow in the same direction.
    • A piping rupture or failure between the tanks and the tank selection valves and pump set would be contained in the Central Heating Plant. This space is constantly manned and regularly monitored. The maximum spill that would go undetected in this area is estimated at 100 gallons.
  • The unleaded gas tank is 4,000 gallons and located above ground in a secondary containment structure able to contain 4,750 gallons indefinitely.
    • A rupture of the fuel truck could dump as much as 2800 gallons on the asphalt, which would tend to flow towards the service building. The drains are connected to the City of Plattsburgh Sanitary Sewer System.
    • All transfers are constantly monitored for this fuel. A hose break or connection leak could dump as much as 25 gallons before corrective action could be accomplished. This amount would spill onto the paved area of the driveway and flow east towards the Service Building.
    • A filling pump accident would be contained in the containment area. The tank is equipped with a solenoid valve that would prevent gravity feed emptying of the tank.
  • The diesel tank is a 500-gallon above ground tank located between the Central Heating Plant and the Service Building in a containment structure.
    • A rupture of the fuel truck could dump as much as 100 gallons on the asphalt, which would tend to flow west towards the Service Building.
    • All transfers are constantly monitored. A hose break or connection leak could dump as much as 25 gallons before corrective action could be accomplished. This amount would spill onto the paved area of the driveway and flow west towards the Service Building.
    • A filling pump accident would be totally contained in the secondary containment area.

Contingency (as per Part )

Inspection Schedule

  • All fuel oil pumping and piping in the Central Heating Plant is inspected every four hours, around the clock.
  • All emergency generator fuel tanks, located in various mechanical rooms are visually inspected once each shift. Formal inspections are conducted monthly. Central Heating Plant personnel conduct the tank inspections. Piping and Generator performance are monitored by Maintenance Department Personnel.

Security

The Service Compound that contains the underground tanks for the Central Heating Plant and the gas and diesel tanks is readily monitored by Central Heating Personnel around the clock.

Personnel Training

  • The Environmental Health Officer is designated as the spill prevention coordinator at this facility.
  • The spill coordinator will give initial training and periodic update training to the designated personnel, on the proper operation of all equipment, including piping, tanks, and pumping equipment. This training will also consist of the proper use of all spill control devices and contingency plans and procedures.

Recording and Follow-up

  • A maintenance schedule has been established and will be adhered to, including recording of maintenance on all fuel related equipment, monthly inspections of these items and monthly recording of such inspections.
  • Emergency procedures will be provided both orally and in writing to all personnel and records kept on each employees training and subsequent updates of safety procedures training.
  • Each Employee will be given information enough to insure his/her understanding of this facility's SPCC plan.

Emergency Generators

Emergency Generator fuel oil tanks are located in the mechanical equipment rooms of eight campus buildings. (Individual locations on chart for tanks numbered 5A through 14A.) These tanks are monitored every eight hours, twenty-four hours a day, 365 days a year.

  • Spill Potential - The fills for these tanks are located on the sides of the buildings away from student access locations. The tanks themselves hold little potential for spill. The areas of concern are the connective piping to the generators. Any undetected leak would enter the sump pit in the mechanical room before being pumped to the municipal wastewater system. In the event of a spill, shut off sump pumps.
  • Spill Containment - Each mechanical equipment room is stocked with absorbent materials to prevent any detected spill from entering the sump pit.

Hydraulic Elevators

The campus has seventeen hydraulic elevators and/or lifts. These are serviced by the Otis Elevator Company, which also performs monthly inspections on all the units except for the garage lifts.

Location Gallons
Adirondack 80 gallons
Algonquin Handicapped elevator - 80 gallons
Algonquin Kitchen elevator - 60 gallons
Angell Kitchen elevator - 60 gallons
Myers Freight elevator - 120 gallons
Yokum 70 gallons
Beaumont 80 gallons
Feinberg Main elevator - 80 gallons
Feinberg Rear elevator - 60 gallons
Ward 70 gallons
C. V. Hall 90 gallons
Clinton Dining Hall 70 gallons
Old Hospital lift - 50 gallons
Service Building loading dock ramps - 2, 20 gallons each
Garage - Vehicle lifts 2, 45 gallons each

Ground Water Contingency Plan

Monitoring

In order to monitor any possible leak of oil to the ground water system from the fuel oil storage tanks at SUNY Plattsburgh the following steps have been taken:

  • Three four-inch diameter wells have been drilled outside the secondary containment area to monitor the ground water. (The well locations are on the attached plot plan. Four well locations are on the attached drilling logs.)
  • The tops of all wells are enclosed by a protective metal casing that has a locking cap. All wells must be locked at all times and clearly marked "Monitoring Well".
  • Monitoring Well #3 located on the extreme northeast section of the property is off the ledge that the other three wells are on. That is why the water flow is to the east even though this is the lowest level of ground water of the three wells.

Release To Subsurface

Any contaminate that leached through the soils from the secondary containment area to the ground water would flow E.S.E. towards Monitoring Well #2. This well would be the location for pump installation in the event of contamination.

Soil Description

  • 0-2'-Backfill Material
  • 2-5'-Medium Sand
  • 5-8"-Gray Till
  • 8-16'-Gray Till to Clay

Appendix

A


Monthly emergency generator fuel tank inspection
Date________________________
1. Check fill area for fuel spills.
2. Check for leaks in piping system.
3. Check tank area for sign of leaks.

1 2 3 Comments
Adirondack        
Banks        
Beaumont        
Wilson        
Infirmary        
Kehoe        
Algonquin        
Whiteface        

B

Part 611 - Environmental Priorities and Procedures in Petroleum Cleanup and Removal (attached)
Part 613 - Handling and Storage of Petroleum (attached)
CFR Part 112 - Oil Pollution Prevention

C

Op-Tech Environmental Services, Inc., Spill Contract and Rate Schedule (attached)

D

Map of Fuel Oil Tank Locations (Attached)
Map of Storm Sewer System (Attached)
Ground Water Contour Map (Attached)

E

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Petroleum Bulk Storage Program Facility Information Report 6/25/2004

Contact Information

Cathleen Eldridge, Associate Director
Office: Sibley Hall 421
Phone: 564-5009
Fax: 564-5082
Email: eldridcm@plattsburgh.edu