Research

Student Research Projects in Biological Science

Undergraduate research opportunities in biology are available with all of our faculty members. Projects range in areas of interest from ecology to cell and molecular biology. Students who engage in undergraduate research gain valuable skills in experimental design, laboratory protocols, and field studies. Such experience is highly advantageous to students applying to graduate school or entering into the job market.

2006

In Vitro Characterization of Chlamydomonas Acidocalcisome H+-PPase as a Function of Light.

  • Student Researcher: Elizabeth R. Meliski
  • Research Mentor: Janice Marchut Conrad
  • Presented at the 70th Annual Northeast Section Meeting, American Society of Plant Biologists, Smith College, Northampton MA, April 2006.

Chlamydomonas Blue Light Shrinking Requires V-H+- ATPase Function

  • Student Researchers: Megan E. Boivin, Barton Higley, Adam N. Favro and Noah Andrew Flint
  • Research Mentors: Janice Marchut Conrad and Peter L. Conrad 
  • Presented at the 70th Annual Northeast Section Meeting, American Society of Plant Biologists, Smith College, Northampton MA, April 2006.

Melatonin (an indole) and Auxin Effects on Chlamydomonas Cell Expansion

  • Student Researchers: Christina M. Polumbo, Nicholas H. Seward, Thomas E. Sladewski and Sean P. Thomas
  • Research Mentors: Janice Marchut Conrad and Peter L. Conrad
  • Presented at the 70th Annual Northeast Section Meeting, American Society of Plant Biologists, Smith College, Northampton MA, April 2006.

2005

Cell Volume Change of Chlamydomonas is Mediated by Red and Blue Light: Involvement of Aquaporin and cAMP in Osmoregulation.

  • Student Researchers: W. Taylor Rooney and LaShauna Quarles (current masters student, M.S.T. Program, SUNY Plattsburgh)
  • Research Mentors: Janice Marchut Conrad and Peter L. Conrad
  • Presented at the 69th Annual Northeast Section Meeting, American Society of Plant Biologists, Binghamton University, Binghamton NY, June 2005

Far-red Light Mediates the Greening of Chlamydomonas Yellow-in-the-Dark Mutants as a Function Of Time in the Dark.

  • Student Researcher: Julie Anna Ritchie (current Ph.D. student, UMASS-Amherst, Plant Biology Program
  • Research Mentor: Janice Marchut Conrad
  • Presented at the 69th Annual Northeast Section Meeting, American Society of Plant Biologists, Binghamton University, Binghamton NY, June 2005

Analysis of coyote DNA

  • Student Researcher: Eamonn Hinchey
  • Research Mentor: Nancy Elwess
  • Presented at the 2005 SUNY Plattsburgh Sigma Xi Symposium

Analysis of the hemoglobin gene in Paramecium tetraurelia

  • Student Researcher: Jennifer Gerard
  • Research Mentor: Nancy Elwess
  • Presented at the 2005 SUNY Plattsburgh Sigma Xi Symposium

House cricket thermal acclimation and locomotion

  • Student Researcher: David Moore
  • Research Mentor: Daniel Vogt
  • Presented at the 2005 SUNY Plattsburgh Sigma Xi Symposium

Investigating gene silencing by RNA interference in Paramecium tetraurelia

  • Student Researcher: Sherie Davis
  • Research Mentor: Nancy Elwess
  • Presented at the 2005 SUNY Plattsburgh Sigma Xi Symposium

Microsatellite DNA analysis of Salvelinus fontinalis

  • Student Researcher: Eric Evans
  • Research Mentor: Nancy Elwess
  • Presented at the 2005 SUNY Plattsburgh Sigma Xi Symposium

Support of "Out of Africa" theory of human evolutionary migration through the isolation of historically significant introns on the Y chromosome.

  • Student Researchers: Nicholas Seward and Amanda Malfer
  • Research Mentor: Nancy Elwess
  • Presented at the 2005 SUNY Plattsburgh Sigma Xi Symposium

Why do so many alien plants successfully invade Hawaii? An examination of the "release from natural enemies" hypothesis.

  • Student Researcher: Richard Elicier
  • Research Mentor: Robert Cabin
  • Presented at the 2005 SUNY Plattsburgh Sigma Xi Symposium

2004

Light Intensity and 730nm Light Affect Greening of Two Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Yellow-in-the- Dark Mutants.

  • Student Researcher: Julie Anna Ritchie
  • Research Mentor: Janice Marchut Conrad
  • Presented at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst Annual Syposium in Plant Biology, October 2004 at Smith College, Northampton MA.

Cell Volume Change in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Requires Light, Calcium and Sufficient Metabolic Energy.

  • Student Researchers: Lindsey Hart, Mary Vasile, Eric Murdie and Jessica Salamy
  • Research Mentors: Janice Marchut Conrad and Peter L. Conrad
  • Presented at the 68th Annual Northeast Section Meeting, American Society of Plant Biologists, Brown University, Providence RI, June 2004.

Chlamydomonas reinhardtii CC735 and STC Differ in Ability to Use Nitrate in the Light; However, Nitric Oxide is Central to Chlorophyll Synthesis in the Dark.

  • Student Researchers: Hiromi Kimura (current M.D. student, Ross University) and Vanessa Johnson
  • Research Mentors: Janice Marchut Conrad and Peter L. Conrad
  • Presented at the 68th Annual Northeast Section Meeting, American Society of Plant Biologists, Brown University, Providence RI, June 2004.

An Fe-deficiency Response of Chlamydomonas Insertional Mutant Involves Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase and Light.

  • Student Researcher: Marcia Blackmoore (current Ph.D. student, Rutgers University Plant Biology Program)
  • Research Mentor: Janice Marchut Conrad
  • Presented at the 68th Annual Northeast Section Meeting, American Society of Plant Biologists, Brown University, Providence RI, June 2004.

Light Intensity and 730nm Light Affect Greening of Two Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Yellow-in-the-Dark Mutants.

  • Student Researchers: Julie Anna Ritchie and Olivia Gillett (Masters student, St. Joseph College, CT)
  • Research Mentors: Janice Marchut Conrad and Peter L. Conrad
  • Presented at the 68th Annual Northeast Section Meeting, American Society of Plant Biologists, Brown University, Providence RI, June 2004.

Analysis of Bacterial Pigments; Absorption Spectra and Solubility

  • Student Researcher: Dawn Lavene
  • Research Mentor: Jose de Ondarza
  • Presented at the SUNY Plattsburgh Sigma Xi Research Symposium in 2004

Questions, Comments, Suggestions?

If you would like more information about biological sciences at SUNY Plattsburgh, please contact:

Dr. Neil Buckley, Chair
Office: Beaumont Hall 444
Phone: (518) 564-3155
Email: neil.buckley@plattsburgh.edu